Mixed reality will soon mean big business for brands

Mixed reality will soon mean big business for brands

Mixed reality will soon mean big business for brands

The answer is a resounding no!  Fortunately, there’s still time left to prepare for one of the biggest digital transformations of all time. Reports suggest that a collection of the world’s leading tech companies, including Microsoft, Apple, Samsung, Huawei, LG, Acer, Intel, Meta, Magic Leap, and ODG are all planning to double down on mixed reality (MR) this year by bringing affordable devices to the masses.

In particular, excitement continues to grow over speculation that Apple may be ready to unveil its MR device in the coming months to coincide with the 10-year anniversary of the iPhone.

To support these claims, Tim Cook has recently made bold statements about augmented reality (AR), indicating his company will have a major horse in the race. Many analysts believe that horse will be the dominant front-runner.

‘AR is going to be as important as eating three meals a day, and once it’s arrived, we will wonder how we ever lived without it, similar to how we feel about our phones’ – Tim Cook

If rumors are true, Apple could instantly flip the switch on mixed reality and seed the globe with first-weekend sales that potentially exceed 40-60 million units, based on prior iPhone launch statistics. Having AR-capable devices delivered at such speed and scale would certainly send both brands and consumers into a frenzy over the immediate demand for readily available content. (This is the same issue we are currently seeing with VR.)

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‘Users will start expecting brands to have mixed reality experiences in 2018. The big money will show up in 2020’ – Robert Scoble

To prepare, every brand needs to have an AR strategy now!

Products become “Always On” digital media channels

Consumers will soon ditch today’s clunky devices in favor of mixed reality glasses with spatial computing powers. These new lenses will pull up interactive 3D holograms, games, websites, video, telecommunications, virtual desktops, and much more.

What this means for brands is that products and objects are going to become next-generation websites filled with 3D content that users can touch, hold, speak to, and learn from. This entirely new medium will give brands and advertisers the ability to engage with – and learn about – their consumers in ways that never existed before. It will close the gap between the physical and digital, allowing brands to create platforms and communities that far exceed limitations posed through today’s existing media channels.  This will also profoundly impact product sales, brand loyalties, and consumer engagement at unimaginable rates.

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As adoption ignites and MR becomes scalable, consumers will soon expect digital content from every product they come in contact with.

For example, a Coca-Cola product will now deliver a realistic 3D gaming, music, or sporting event experience. Food products like Hellman’s Mayonnaise or Extra Virgin Olive Oil will be able to deliver exclusive 3D recipe tutorials given by a Rachel Ray hologram (You may even want to hold and interact with a 3D catalog of her cookware set). Many of the items that make it into your grocery cart will have digital discounts and product benefits displayed straight from the package as you walk down the aisle and shop.

For brands, mixed reality means that everything in the world can now become a media channel and ANY creative concept imaginable can be executed.

Because we will rely on these new MR glasses for practically everything we do, and because we could potentially wear them throughout most of our day, there will be a significant increase in the amount of content we consume on a daily basis. For brands, this could mean more advertising opportunities that allow them to capture — and learn from — behavioral data.

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Ultimately, however, this will also mean that trillions of physical objects in our world must be indexed in order to have some type of relevant content associated with them.



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