For location analytics

For location analytics, only the best, most current data will do

For location analytics, only the best, most current data will do

In geospatial tech, data has always been the lost stepchild. Or, it’s the “rocket fuel” of geographic information systems (GIS). Take your pick. It depends on who you work for or what you need. The bottom line? For location analytics, only the best, most current data will do.

Today, data is the new bacon. It sizzles; it’s crispy; it’s essential to the complete buffet of geographic information systems (GIS). There are no eggs without bacon. Likewise, you can’t run GIS or advanced location analytics without data.

In today’s mobile society, there is more location-based data than ever before being collected and repackaged for sale. Twitter, Facebook, and other social media apps collect data from their users and offer it to advertisers. Anonymously, of course. But cell phones are constantly broadcasting location-based data – how else would you play PokemonGo? And, standard fare that includes population demographics are “meat and potatoes” for today’s hungry marketing managers.

Read Also:
Teaching an Algorithm to Understand Right and Wrong

Yet, the challenge for many users is an inability to find this so-called smorgasbord of data. And if found, how to consume it. Pitney Bowes offers a data catalog replete with an abundance of data. It’s digestible since it has been divided into discrete categories: streets, points of interest, boundaries and demographics. To this menu has been added industry data bundles for retail, insurance, telecommunications and others. The coverage is global, the content rich and the file formats for use are extensive.

While GIS is familiar to those educated about location technology, others are new to location analytics – especially the millions of users of business intelligence (BI) solutions that are starting to include basic mapping.  In the BI domain, maps are the background against which analysts and line of business users display data and analytics. For example, heat maps showing the concentrations of customers, facilities or even IoT devices offer a unique proximity of spatial relationships not afforded by spreadsheets. Taking in data from in-house and external sources is essential to deriving the insights that impact business outcomes.

Read Also:
IT: Easy data visualization and analysis, all day, every day


Chief Analytics Officer Spring 2017

2
May
2017
Chief Analytics Officer Spring 2017

15% off with code MP15

Read Also:
Five Things So-Called “Business Intelligence” Vendors Don’t Talk About

Big Data and Analytics for Healthcare Philadelphia

17
May
2017
Big Data and Analytics for Healthcare Philadelphia

$200 off with code DATA200

Read Also:
5 ways businesses can capitalize on smart data discovery tools

SMX London

23
May
2017
SMX London

10% off with code 7WDATASMX

Read Also:
Data Visualization In A Breaking News Environment

Data Science Congress 2017

5
Jun
2017
Data Science Congress 2017

20% off with code 7wdata_DSC2017

Read Also:
Data with personality: the evolution of visualisation

AI Paris

6
Jun
2017
AI Paris

20% off with code AIP17-7WDATA-20

Read Also:
Data Visualization In A Breaking News Environment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *