35 books on Data Visualization

35 books on Data Visualization

35 books on Data Visualization

A modern classic. Tufte teaches the fundamentals of graphics, charts, maps and tables. "A visual Strunk and White" (The Boston Globe). Includes 250 delightfullly entertaining illustrations, all beautifully printed.

2. Visualize This: The FlowingData Guide to Design, Visualization, and...

Practical data design tips from a data visualization expert of the modern age. Presents a unique approach to visualizing and telling stories with data, from a data visualization expert and the creator of flowingdata.com, Nathan Yau. Offers step-by-step tutorials and practical design tips for creating statistical graphics, geographical maps, and information design to find meaning in the numbers. Details tools that can be used to visualize data-native graphics for the Web, such as ActionScript, Flash libraries, PHP, and JavaScript and tools to design graphics for print, such as R and Illustrator. Contains numerous examples and descriptions of patterns and outliers and explains how to show them.

Originally published in French in 1967, Semiology of Graphics holds a significant place in the theory of information design. Founded on Jacques Bertin’s practical experience as a cartographer, Part One of this work is an unprecedented attempt to synthesize principles of graphic communication with the logic of standard rules applied to writing and topography. Part Two brings Bertin’s theory to life, presenting a close study of graphic techniques including shape, orientation, color, texture, volume, and size in an array of more than 1,000 maps and diagrams.

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The role of machine learning in data science and analytics

In Visual Thinking for Design, Colin Ware takes what we now know about perception, cognition, and attention and transforms it into concrete advice that designers can directly apply. He demonstrates how designs can be considered as tools for cognition - extensions of the viewer's brain in much the same way that a hammer is an extension of the user's hand. Experienced professional designers and students alike will learn how to maximize the power of the information tools they design for the people who use them.

Most designers know that yellow text presented against a blue background reads clearly and easily, but how many can explain why, and what really are the best ways to help others and ourselves clearly see key patterns in a bunch of data? This book explores the art and science of why we see objects the way we do. Based on the science of perception and vision, the author presents the key principles at work for a wide range of applications--resulting in visualization of improved clarity, utility, and persuasiveness.

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How William Cleveland Turned Data Visualization Into a Science

A leader in the field of data visualization, Stephen Few exposes the common problems in dashboard design and describes its best practices in great detail and with a multitude of examples in this updated second edition. According to the author, dashboards have become a popular means to present critical information at a glance, yet few do so effectively.

 



Data Science Congress 2017

5
Jun
2017
Data Science Congress 2017

20% off with code 7wdata_DSC2017

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The role of machine learning in data science and analytics

AI Paris

6
Jun
2017
AI Paris

20% off with code AIP17-7WDATA-20

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This open source tool from MIT Data Lab will change how you see big data

Chief Data Officer Summit San Francisco

7
Jun
2017
Chief Data Officer Summit San Francisco

$200 off with code DATA200

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Is your company data-driven?

Customer Analytics Innovation Summit Chicago

7
Jun
2017
Customer Analytics Innovation Summit Chicago

$200 off with code DATA200

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Association Rule Mining – Not Your Typical Data Science Algorithm
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Big Data In Investing: The Quants Have Taken Over

HR & Workforce Analytics Innovation Summit 2017 London

12
Jun
2017
HR & Workforce Analytics Innovation Summit 2017 London

$200 off with code DATA200

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Legal marijuana needs big data to grow

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